Étiquette : serotonine

Peyote – Mescaline Scientific Papers, AEDMP – 2014-

Peyote - Mescaline Scientific Papers AEDMP - Asociación para el Estudio y la Divulgación de la Medicina Psicodélica Research conducted by : Juan Spuch & Genís Oña Divulgación de la Medicina Psicodélica. Castellarnau, 11 2º 1ª 43004 Tarragona Spain Tel. 675 55 33 44 Email: medicina.psicodelica@hotmail.com www.medicinapsicodelica.org Content _____________________________________ 1. What is peyote? 2. Scientific papers about peyote - mescaline arranged chronologically (1954-2012) - H. Denber & S. Merlis (1954). A Note on Some Therapeutic Implications of the Mescaline induced State - C. Landis & J. Clausen (1954). Certain Effects of Mescaline and Lysergic Acid on Psychological Functions - J. Cattell (1954). The Influence of Mescaline on Psychodynamic Material - W. Frederking (1955). Intoxicant [...]

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Psychedelic Induced Transpersonal Experiences, Therapies, and Their Implications for Transpersonal Psychology, Thomas B. Roberts and Michael J. Winkelman, 2013

Psychedelic Induced Transpersonal Experiences, Therapies, and Their Implications for Transpersonal Psychology Thomas B. Roberts and Michael J. Winkelman Chapter 25 - The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Transpersonal Psychology, First Edition. Edited by Harris L. Friedman and Glenn Hartelius. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Published 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.   Psychedelics and other natural and synthetic substances have an ability to induce a range of transpersonal experiences. The predominance of spiritually-related experiences from these substances has led to the development of the concept of entheogen— reflecting their potential to produce an internal experience of communing with god. The similarity of the drug-induced transpersonal [...]

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Psychiatry might need some psychedelic therapy, Matthew W. Johnson, 2018

Psychiatry might need some psychedelic therapy Matthew W. Johnson International Review of Psychiatry, 2018, 30, 4, 285-290, DOI: 10.1080/09540261.2018.1509544   EDITORIAL Psychiatry might need some psychedelic therapy In historical and modern-day studies, psychedelic drugs have shown promise in managing a variety of psychiatric disorders, but their medical use has often raised controversies. The controversies have related to social, political, and legal challenges. History Although anthropological evidence suggests that classic psychedelic drugs (hereafter, ‘psychedelics’) have been used by various indigenous peoples as sacraments and healing agents before recorded history, in the mid-twentieth century they came to occupy a place at the cutting edge of psychiatric research (Johnson, Richards, & Griffiths, [...]

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Long-term follow-up of psilocybin-facilitated smoking cessation, Johnson M.W. et al., 2017

Long-term follow-up of psilocybin-facilitated smoking cessation Johnson M.W., Garcia-Romeu A., Griffiths R.R. The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 2017, 43, (1), 55–60 http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00952990.2016.1170135   Abstract Background : A recent open-label pilot study (N = 15) found that two to three moderate to high doses (20 and 30 mg/70 kg) of the serotonin 2A receptor agonist, psilocybin, in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for smoking cessation, resulted in substantially higher 6-month smoking abstinence rates than are typically observed with other medications or CBT alone. Objectives : To assess long-term effects of a psilocybin-facilitated smoking cessation program at ≥12 months after psilocybin administration. Methods : The present [...]

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The paradoxical psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), R. L. Carhart-Harris et al., 2016

The paradoxical psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) R. L. Carhart-Harris, M. Kaelen, M. Bolstridge, T. M. Williams, L. T. Williams, R. Underwood, A. Feilding and D. J. Nutt Psychological Medicine, 2016, 46, 1379–1390. doi:10.1017/S0033291715002901   Background : Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a potent serotonergic hallucinogen or psychedelic that modulates consciousness in a marked and novel way. This study sought to examine the acute and mid-term psychological effects of LSD in a controlled study. Method : A total of 20 healthy volunteers participated in this within-subjects study. Participants received LSD (75 μg, intravenously) on one occasion and placebo (saline, intravenously) on another, in a [...]

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Psychedelic Drugs in Biomedicine, Evan J. KYZAR, 2017

Psychedelic Drugs in Biomedicine Evan J. KYZAR, Charles D. NICHOLS, Paul R. GAINETDINOV, David E. NICHOLS, Allan V. KALUEFF  Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, 2017, 38, (1), 992-1005 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tips.2017.08.003 Trends Psychedelic drugs profoundly alter human behavior, acting primarily via agonism at the 5-HT2A receptor in the brain. Research into the mechanisms of psychedelic drugs is experiencing a renaissance after years of stagnation. Animal models show that psychedelic drugs alter a number of crucial molecular mechanisms. Psychedelic drugs cause widespread changes in cognition and brain connectivity. Recent pilot studies show LSD and psilocybin are effective in treating psychiatric disorders and possibly other illnesses. Psychedelic biomedicine is rapidly emerging as an important area [...]

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Role of the Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptor in Learning , John A. Harvey, 2003

Role of the Serotonin 5-HT2A Receptor in Learning John A. Harvey Learning & Memory, 2003, 355-362 www.learnmem.org http://www.learnmem.org/cgi/doi/10.1101/lm.60803.   This study reviews the role of the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor in learning as measured by the acquisition of the rabbit’s classically conditioning nictitating membrane response, a component of the eyeblink response. Agonists at the 5-HT2A receptor including LSD (d-lysergic acid diethylamide) enhanced associative learning at doses that produce cognitive effects in humans. Some antagonists such as BOL (d-bromolysergic acid diethylamide), LY53,857, and ketanserin acted as neutral antagonists in that they had no effect on learning, whereas others (MDL11,939, ritanserin, and mianserin) acted as inverse agonists in that [...]

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The Neurobiology of Psychedelic Drugs: Implications for the Treatment of Mood Disorders, Franz X. VOLLENWEIDER & Michael KOMETER, 201O

The Neurobiology of Psychedelic Drugs: Implications for the Treatment of Mood Disorders Franz X. VOLLENWEIDER & Michael KOMETER Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 2010, 11, (9), 642-51 DOI: 10.1038/nrn2884   Abstract After a pause of nearly 40 years in research into the effects of psychedelic drugs, recent advances in our understanding of the neurobiology of psychedelics, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin and ketamine have led to renewed interest in the clinical potential of psychedelics in the treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Recent behavioural and neuroimaging data show that psychedelics modulate neural circuits that have been implicated in mood and affective disorders, and can reduce the clinical [...]

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Psychedelics and Mental Health : A Population Study, Teri S. Krebs & Pal-Ørjan Johansen, 2013

Psychedelics and Mental Health : A Population Study Teri S. Krebs, Pal-Ørjan Johansen PLoS ONE, 2013, 8, (8): e63972. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0063972   Abstract Background : The classical serotonergic psychedelics LSD, psilocybin, mescaline are not known to cause brain damage and are regarded as non-addictive. Clinical studies do not suggest that psychedelics cause long-term mental health problems. Psychedelics have been used in the Americas for thousands of years. Over 30 million people currently living in the US have used LSD, psilocybin, or mescaline. Objective : To evaluate the association between the lifetime use of psychedelics and current mental health in the adult population. Method : Data drawn from years 2001 [...]

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The Therapeutic Potential of Psychedelic Drugs: Past, Present, and Future, Robin L Carhart-Harris and Guy M Goodwin, 2017

The Therapeutic Potential of Psychedelic Drugs: Past, Present, and Future Robin L Carhart-Harris and Guy M Goodwin Neuropsychopharmacology, 2017, 42, 2105–2113 doi:10.1038/npp.2017.84; published online 17 May 2017 Plant-based psychedelics, such as psilocybin, have an ancient history of medicinal use. After the first English language report on LSD in 1950, psychedelics enjoyed a short-lived relationship with psychology and psychiatry. Used most notably as aids to psychotherapy for the treatment of mood disorders and alcohol dependence, drugs such as LSD showed initial therapeutic promise before prohibitive legislature in the mid-1960s effectively ended all major psychedelic research programs. Since the early 1990s, there has been a steady [...]

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