Étiquette : trouble mental

Emergency department presentations related to acute toxicity following recreational use of cannabis products in Switzerland, Yasmin Schmid et al., 2019

Emergency department presentations related to acute toxicity following recreational use of cannabis products in Switzerland Yasmin Schmid, Irene Scholz, Laura Mueller, Aristomenis K. Exadaktylos, Alessandro Ceschi, Matthias E. Liechti, Evangelia Liakoni Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.107726   A B S T R A C T Background : Concomitant use of cannabis and other psychoactive substances is common and it is often difficult to differentiate its acute effects from those of other substances. This study aimed to characterize the acute toxicity of cannabis with and without co-use of other substances. Methods : Retrospective analysis of cases presenting at the emergency departments of three large hospitals in Switzerland due [...]

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Adolescent Cannabis Use : What is the Evidence for Functional Brain Alteration ?, V. Lorenzetti et al., 2016

Adolescent Cannabis Use : What is the Evidence for Functional Brain Alteration ? V. Lorenzetti, S. Alonso-Lanaa, G. J. Youssef, A. Verdejo-Garcia, C. Suo, J. Cousijn, M. Takagi, M. Yücel and N. Solowij Current Pharmaceutical Design, 2016, 22, 1-14. DOI: 10.2174/1381612822666160805155922   Abstract Background : Cannabis use typically commences during adolescence, a period during which the brain undergoes profound remodeling in areas that are high in cannabinoid receptors and that mediate cognitive control and emotion regulation. It is therefore important to determine the impact of adolescent cannabis use on brain function. Objective : We investigate the impact of adolescent cannabis use on brain function by reviewing the functional [...]

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Prevalence and Correlates of Cannabis Use in Outpatients with Serious Mental Illness receiving treatment for Alcohol Use Disorders, Jordan Skalisky et al., 2017

Prevalence and Correlates of Cannabis Use in Outpatients with Serious Mental Illness receiving treatment for Alcohol Use Disorders Jordan Skalisky, Emily Leickly, Oladunni Oluwoye, Sterling M. McPherson, Debra Srebnik, John M. Roll, Richard K. Ries, and Michael G. McDonell Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, 2017, 2, 1, 133-138. Doi : 10.1089/can.2017.0006   Abstract Introduction : People with serious mental illness (SMI) use cannabis more than any other illicit drug. Cannabis use is associated with increased psychotic symptoms and is highly comorbid with alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Despite the national trend toward decriminalization, little is known about the prevalence, correlates, and impact of cannabis use on those with SMI [...]

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Psychedelics : Where we are now, why we got here, what we must do, Sean J. Belouin & Jack E. Henningfield, 2018

Psychedelics : Where we are now, why we got here, what we must do Sean J. Belouin, Jack E. Henningfield Neuropharmacology, 2018, 142, 7e19 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2018.02.018 a b s t r a c t The purpose of this commentary is to provide an introduction to this special issue of Neuropharmacology with a historical perspective of psychedelic drug research, their use in psychiatric disorders, research restricting regulatory controls, and their recent emergence as potential breakthrough therapies for several brain-related disorders. It begins with the discovery of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its promising development as a treatment for several types of mental illnesses during the 1940s. This was [...]

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Psychiatry & the psychedelic drugs. Past, present & future, James J.H. Rucker et al., 2018

Psychiatry & the psychedelic drugs. Past, present & future James J.H. Rucker, Jonathan Iliff, David J. Nutt Neuropharmacology, 2018, 142, 200e218 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2017.12.040   a b s t r a c t The classical psychedelic drugs, including psilocybin, lysergic acid diethylamide and mescaline, were used extensively in psychiatry before they were placed in Schedule I of the UN Convention on Drugs in 1967. Experimentation and clinical trials undertaken prior to legal sanction suggest that they are not helpful for those with established psychotic disorders and should be avoided in those liable to develop them. However, those with so-called ‘psychoneurotic’ disorders sometimes benefited considerably from their tendency to [...]

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Effects of cannabidiol (CBD) in neuropsychiatric disorders: A review of pre-clinical and clinical findings, Sonja ELSAID, 2019

Effects of cannabidiol (CBD) in neuropsychiatric disorders: A review of pre-clinical and clinical findings. Molecular Basis of Neuropsychiatric Disorders : from Bench to Bedside Sonja ELSAID, Stefan KLOIBER, Bernard Le FOLL Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science, 2019, 167, 25-75. doi : 10.1016/bs.pmbts.2019.06.005. Cannabis sativa (cannabis) is on of the oldest plants cultivated by men. Cannabidiol (CBD) is the major non-psychomimetic compound derived from cannabis. It has been proposed to have a therapeutic potential over a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this narrative review, we have summarized a selected number of pre-clinical and clinical studies, examining the effects of CBD in neuropsychiatric [...]

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Preclinical and Clinical Evidence Supporting Use of Cannabidiol in Psychiatry, Gioacchino Calapai et al., 2019

Preclinical and Clinical Evidence Supporting Use of Cannabidiol in Psychiatry Gioacchino Calapai, Carmen Mannucci, Ioanna Chinou, Luigi Cardia, Fabrizio Calapai, Emanuela Elisa Sorbara, Bernardo Firenzuoli, Valdo Ricca, Gian Franco Gensini and Fabio Firenzuoli Hindawi - Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2019, Article ID 2509129, 11 pages https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/2509129   Background : Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major chemical compound present in Cannabis sativa. CBD is a nonpsychotomimetic substance, and it is considered one of the most promising candidates for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Objective. &e aim of this review is to illustrate the state of art about scientific research and the evidence of effectiveness of CBD [...]

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Childhood trauma and being at-risk for psychosis are associated with higher peripheral endocannabinoids, E. Appiah-Kusi et al., 2019

Childhood trauma and being at-risk for psychosis are associated with higher peripheral endocannabinoids E. Appiah-Kusi, R. Wilson, M.Colizzi, E. Foglia, Sagnik Bhattacharyya, et al. Psychological Medicine, 2019. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291719001946 Published online by Cambridge University Press: 19 August 2019 Abstract BackgroundEvidence has been accumulating regarding alterations in components of the endocannabinoid system in patients with psychosis. Of all the putative risk factors associated with psychosis, being at clinical high-risk for psychosis (CHR) has the strongest association with the onset of psychosis, and exposure to childhood trauma has been linked to an increased risk of development of psychotic disorder. We aimed to investigate whether being at-risk for [...]

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Hallucinogen Persistent Perception Disorder Induced by New Psychoactive Substituted Phenethylamines; A Review with Illustrative Case, Cornel N. Stanciu and Thomas M. Penders, 2016.

Hallucinogen Persistent Perception Disorder Induced by New Psychoactive Substituted Phenethylamines; A Review with Illustrative Case Cornel N. Stanciu and Thomas M. Penders Current Psychiatry Reviews, 2016, Vol. 12, No. 2, 1-3. DOI: 10.2174/1573400512666160216234850   Abstract : Hallucinogen Persistent Perception Disorder (HPPD) is considered an “uncommon” disorder described in association with use of hallucinogens such as LSD, mescaline and psilocybin. Despite multiple mentions of persistence of visual disturbances reported by users on online forums, clinicians may not be aware of this complication. There have been few descriptions of HPPD in association with use of new psychoactive substances (such as 2C-E). Increasing use of these designer stimulants places [...]

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The Role of MDMA Neurotoxicity in Anxiety, Casey R. Guillot et al., 2007

The Role of MDMA Neurotoxicity in Anxiety Casey R. Guillot, Mitchell E. Berman and Brenton R. Abadie In : Neurotoxicity Syndromes, Chapter I ISBN: 978-1-60021-797-5 Editor: Linda R. Webster, pp. 1 - 36 © 2007 Nova Science Publishers, Inc. Abstract The drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; Ecstasy) long has been considered a neurotoxin selective for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) axons in rats and nonhuman primates. MDMA is also thought to have the potential to cause persistent serotonergic alterations in humans. Since the serotonin system is involved in the regulation of anxiety, researchers have proposed that recreational Ecstasy users may be at risk for the development of anxiety disorders and symptoms. [...]

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