Catégorie : Cannabis et Réduction des Risques

Menace or medicine? Anthropological perspectives on the self-administration of high potency cannabis in the UK, Anna Waldstein, 2010

Menace or medicine? Anthropological perspectives on the self-administration of high potency cannabis in the UK Anna Waldstein Drugs and Alcohol Today • Volume 10 Issue 3 • September 2010   Abstract Domestically produced, high potency cannabis (often referred to as ‘skunk’ in the mainstream UK media) has become increasingly widespread in the UK. This paper considers whether the trend reflects an increased awareness of and desire for medical marijuana. Determining whether cannabis is a drug or a medicine depends on its objective physiological effects – which may vary from one individual to another – as well as how and why those effects are experienced. The [...]

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Cannabinoïds and cancer: causation, remediation, and palliation, Wayne Hall et al., 2005

Cannabinoïds and cancer: causation, remediation, and palliation Wayne Hall, MacDonald Christie, David Currow Lancet Oncology, 2005, 6, 35–42 http://oncology.thelancet.com   This review discusses three different associations between cannabinoids and cancer. First, it assesses evidence that smoking of cannabis preparations may cause cancers of the aerodigestive and respiratory system. There have been case reports of upper-respiratory-tract cancers in young adults who smoke cannabis, but evidence from a few epidemiological cohort studies and case-control studies is inconsistent. Second, there is mixed evidence on the effects of THC and other cannabinoids on cancers: in some in vitro and in vivo studies THC and some synthetic cannabinoids have had [...]

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Patient Counseling Guidelines for the Use of Cannabis for the Treatment of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea/Vomiting and Chronic Pain, Patrick Makary et al., 2019

Patient Counseling Guidelines for the Use of Cannabis for the Treatment of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea/Vomiting and Chronic Pain Patrick Makary, Jayesh R. Parmar, Natalie Mims, Nile M. Khanfar and Robert A. Freeman JOURNAL OF PAIN & PALLIATIVE CARE PHARMACOTHERAPY, 2019 https://doi.org/10.1080/15360288.2019.1598531 ABSTRACT The use of cannabis medications has grown in recent years for the symptomatic relief of chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting (CINV) and chronic pain (cancer-related and noncancer-related). As states legalize the use of cannabis, it is important for pharmacists and other health care professionals to beaware of how to counsel patients receiving prescriptions for cannabis medications. The aim of this study was to develop patient counseling guidelines [...]

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A burning problem : cannabis lessons learned from Colorado, Jamie E. Parnes et al., 2018

A burning problem: cannabis lessons learned from Colorado Jamie E. Parnes, Adrian J. Bravo, Bradley T. Conner and Matthew R. Pearson ADDICTION RESEARCH & THEORY, 2018, VOL. 26, NO. 1, 3–10 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/16066359.2017.1315410   ABSTRACT With recent increases in cannabis’ popularity, including being legalized in several states, new issues have emerged related to use. Increases in the number of users, new products, and home growing all present distinct concerns. In the present review, we explored various cannabis-related concerns (i.e. use, acquiring, growing, and public health/policy) that have arisen in Colorado in order to provide information on emerging issues and future directions to mitigate negative outcomes that could [...]

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CANNABIS PEER REVIEW 1964-2016, Over 650 Peer Reviewed Reports & Studies On Cannabis, 2017

CANNABIS PEER REVIEW 1964-2016 Over 650 Peer Reviewed Reports & Studies On Cannabis A Free Jeff Prager Publication Health benefits, cancer fighting qualities and many other medicinal advantages can be attributed to the Cannabis Plant. Likewise, diseases and disorders are also related to smoking, vaping and ingesting components of the Cannabis Plant. Cannabis users should be aware and well informed regarding both the positive effects and the negative consequences of regular Cannabis use and this eBook accomplishes that goal by employing over 400 current peer reviewed reports and studies—their findings— with active hyper links to each report. A Free Jeff Prager No-Copyright Publication for [...]

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The Role of Cannabinoids in Neuroanatomic Alterations in Cannabis Users, Valentina Lorenzetti et al., 2016

The Role of Cannabinoids in Neuroanatomic Alterations in Cannabis Users Valentina Lorenzetti, Nadia Solowij, and Murat Yücel Biological Psychiatry, 2016, 79:e17-e31 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2015.11.013 ABSTRACT The past few decades have seen a marked change in the composition of commonly smoked cannabis. These changes primarily involve an increase of the psychoactive compound Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and a decrease of the potentially therapeutic compound cannabidiol (CBD). This altered composition of cannabis may be linked to persistent neuroanatomic alterations typically seen in regular cannabis users. In this review, we summarize recent findings from human structural neuroimaging investigations. We examine whether neuroanatomic alterations are 1) consistently observed in samples of regular cannabis [...]

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Cannabis Use in Pregnancy. A Tale of 2 Concerns, Michael Silverstein et al., 2019

Cannabis Use in Pregnancy. A Tale of 2 Concerns Michael Silverstein, MD, MPH1,2; Elizabeth A. Howell, MD, MPH3; Barry Zuckerman, MD1 JAMA. Published online June 18, 2019. doi:10.1001/jama.2019.8860 Original Investigation Association Between Self-reported Prenatal Cannabis Use and Maternal, Perinatal, and Neonatal Outcomes Daniel J. Corsi, PhD; Laura Walsh, MSc; Deborah Weiss, PhD; Helen Hsu, MD; Darine El-Chaar, MD; Steven Hawken, PhD; Deshayne B. Fell, PhD; Mark Walker, MD Research Letter Medical and Nonmedical Cannabis Use Among Pregnant Women in the United States Nora D. Volkow, MD; Beth Han, MD, PhD, MPH; Wilson M. Compton, MD, MPE; Elinore F. McCance-Katz, MD, PhD Full Text, https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2736581   In an article in JAMA, Corsi and colleagues1 present the results of a retrospective cohort study of 661 617 women designed to assess associations between maternal cannabis use during pregnancy and adverse obstetrical and [...]

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Self-reported Medical and Nonmedical Cannabis Use Among Pregnant Women in the United States, Nora D. Volkow et al., 2019

RESEARCH LETTER Self-reported Medical and Non-medical Cannabis Use Among Pregnant Women in the United States JAMA, Published online June 18, 2019. doi: 10.1001/jama.2019.7982 Cannabis use increased among pregnantwomenin the United States from2002 to 2014.1 However, changes in cannabis use and frequency by trimester over time and national prevalence of medical cannabis use during pregnancy are unknown. Data fromtheNational Survey on Drug Use andHealth (NSDUH) were examined to address these knowledge gaps. Methods : Data were from women aged 12 to 44 years who participated in the 2002-2017 NSDUH, a representative survey of the US civilian, noninstitutionalized population.2 Collection of NSDUH data was approved [...]

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Association Between Self-reported Prenatal Cannabis Use and Maternal, Perinatal, and Neonatal Outcomes, Daniel J. Corsi et al., 2019

Association Between Self-reported Prenatal Cannabis Use and Maternal, Perinatal, and Neonatal Outcomes Daniel J. Corsi, PhD; LauraWalsh, MSc; DeborahWeiss, PhD; Helen Hsu, MD; Darine El-Chaar, MD; Steven Hawken, PhD; Deshayne B. Fell, PhD; MarkWalker,MD JAMA,  Published online June 18, 2019. doi:10.1001/jama.2019.8734   Key Points Question  Is there an association between prenatal cannabis exposure and maternal, perinatal, and neonatal outcomes? Findings  In this retrospective cohort study that included 661 617 pregnancies and 9427 reported cannabis users, the rate of preterm birth among reported cannabis users was 12% vs 6% in nonusers, a statistically significant difference. Meaning  Reported cannabis use in pregnancy was associated with significant increases in the rate of preterm [...]

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Epigenetic Effects of Cannabis Exposure, Henrietta Szutorisz and Yasmin L. Hurd, 2016

Epigenetic Effects of Cannabis Exposure Henrietta Szutorisz and Yasmin L. Hurd Biological Psychiatry, 2016, 79, 7,  586–594. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2015.09.014. Abstract The past decade has witnessed a number of societal and political changes that have raised critical questions about the long-term impact of marijuana (Cannabis sativa) that are especially important given the prevalence of its abuse and that potential long-term effects still largely lack scientific data. Disturbances of the epigenome have generally been hypothesized as the molecular machinery underlying the persistent, often tissue-specific transcriptional and behavioral effects of cannabinoids that have been observed within one’s lifetime and even into the subsequent generation. Here, we provide an overview [...]

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