Étiquette : hallucinogenes

Ayahuasca in Adolescence : A Neuropsychological Assessment, Evelyn Doering-Silveira, Charles S. Grob et al., 2005

Ayahuasca in Adolescence : A Neuropsychological Assessment Evelyn Doering-Silveira, Enrique Lopez,  Charles S. Grob, Marlene Dobkin de Rios, Luisa K. Alonso, Cristiane Tacla,Itiro Shirakawa,  Paulo H. Bertolucci,  & Dartiu X. Da Silveira Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 2005, 37, (2), 123-128.   Abstract The purpose of the study was to evaluate neuropsychologically adolescents who use ayahuasca in a religious context. A battery of neuropsychological tests was administered to adolescents who use ayahuasca. These subjects were compared to a matched control group of adolescents who did not use ayahuasca. The controls were matched with regards to sex, age, and education. The neuropsychological battery included tests of speeded [...]

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Ayahuasca in Adolescence : A Preliminary Psychiatric Assessment, Dartiu Xavier Da Silveira, Charles S. Grob et al., 2005

Ayahuasca in Adolescence : A Preliminary Psychiatric Assessment Dartiu Xavier Da Silveira; Charles S. Grob; Marlene Dobkin de Rios; Enrique Lopez; Luisa K. Alonso; Cristiane Tacla & Evelyn Doering-Silveira Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 2005, 37, (2), 129-133. www.neip.info   Abstract Ayahuasca is believed to be harmless for those (including adolescents) drinking it within a religious setting. Nevertheless controlled studies on the mental/ psychiatric status of ritual hallucinogenic ayahuasca concoction consumers are still lacking. In this study, 40 adolescents from a Brazilian ayahuasca sect were compared with 40 controls matched on sex, age, and educational background for psychiatric symptomatology. Screening scales for depression, anxiety, alcohol consumption patterns (abuse), [...]

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Hallucinogen Persistent Perception Disorder Induced by New Psychoactive Substituted Phenethylamines; A Review with Illustrative Case, Cornel N. Stanciu and Thomas M. Penders, 2016.

Hallucinogen Persistent Perception Disorder Induced by New Psychoactive Substituted Phenethylamines; A Review with Illustrative Case Cornel N. Stanciu and Thomas M. Penders Current Psychiatry Reviews, 2016, Vol. 12, No. 2, 1-3. DOI: 10.2174/1573400512666160216234850   Abstract : Hallucinogen Persistent Perception Disorder (HPPD) is considered an “uncommon” disorder described in association with use of hallucinogens such as LSD, mescaline and psilocybin. Despite multiple mentions of persistence of visual disturbances reported by users on online forums, clinicians may not be aware of this complication. There have been few descriptions of HPPD in association with use of new psychoactive substances (such as 2C-E). Increasing use of these designer stimulants places [...]

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A History of Drug Use : Mind-Altering Drugs in Social Context, Eric Shepperd, 2017

A History of Drug Use : Mind-Altering Drugs in Social Context Eric Shepperd January 21, 2017, 26 p.   It seems that an intrinsic property of consciousness is a desire to alter itself. The natural world is full of tools for changing the functioning of the mind, and both humans and nonhuman animals have used many different drugs throughout history. Some are derived directly from plant or animal sources, while others are refined extracts, or synthesized by purely chemical methods. Many of the drugs in use today are applied primarily for physiologically therapeutic purposes, while others have primarily psychological components, or a combination thereof. Psychoactive [...]

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Legal highs : staying on top of the flood of novel psychoactive substances, David Baumeister et al., 2015

Legal highs : staying on top of the flood of novel psychoactive substances David Baumeister, Luis M. Tojo and Derek K. Tracy Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology, 2015, Vol. 5, (2), 97–132 DOI: 10.1177/2045125314559539   Abstract : There has been growing clinical, public, and media awareness and concern about the availability and potential harmfulness of so-called ‘legal highs’, which are more appropriately called new or novel psychoactive substances (NPS). A cat-and-mouse process has emerged wherein unknown chemists and laboratories are producing new, and as yet nonproscribed, compounds for human consumption; and as soon as they are banned, which they inevitably are, slightly modified analogues are produced to [...]

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Psychedelics, David E. Nichols, 2016

Psychedelics David E. Nichols Pharmacological Review, 2016, 68, 264–355 http://dx.doi.org/10.1124/pr.115.011478   Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .266 I. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [...]

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The Consumption of Psychoactive Plants During Religious Rituals : The Roots of Common Symbols and Figures in Religions and Myths, H. Umit Sayin, 2014

The Consumption of Psychoactive Plants During Religious Rituals: The Roots of Common Symbols and Figures in Religions and Myths H. Umit Sayin NeuroQuantology | June 2014 | Volume 12 | Issue 2 | Page 276-296 DOI: 10.14704/nq.2014.12.2.753   ABSTRACT Psychoactive plants which contain hallucinogenic molecules that induce a form of altered states of consciousness (HASC) have been widely used during the religious rituals of many cultures throughout the centuries, while the consumption of these plants for spiritual and religious purposes is as old as human history. Some of those cultures were shaman and pagan subcultures; African native religions; Bwiti Cult; South American native religions; Amazon Cultures; [...]

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Psychedelics as Medicines for Substance Abuse Rehabilitation : Evaluating Treatments with LSD, Peyote, Ibogaine and Ayahuasca Michael Winkelman, 2014

Psychedelics as Medicines for Substance Abuse Rehabilitation : Evaluating Treatments with LSD, Peyote, Ibogaine and Ayahuasca Michael Winkelman Current Drug Abuse Reviews, 2014, 7, 101-116   Abstract : Substances known as psychedelics, hallucinogens and entheogens have been employed in ethnomedical traditions for thousands of years, but after promising uses in the 1950’s and 1960’s they were largely prohibited in medical treatment and human research starting in the 1970’s as part of the fallout from the war on drugs. Nonetheless, there are a number of studies which suggest that these substances have potential applications in the treatment of addictions. While these substances are generally classified as [...]

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Clinical potential of psilocybine as a treatment for mental health conditions, Jeremy Daniel & Margaret Haberman, 2017.

Clinical potential of psilocybine as a treatment for mental health conditions Jeremy Daniel & Margaret Haberman Mental Health Clinician, 2017, Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 24-28 https://doi.org/10.9740/mhc.2017.01.024   Abstract Psilocybin, a classic hallucinogen, is a chemical produced by more than 100 species of mushrooms worldwide. It has high affinity for several serotonin receptors, including 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT2C, located in numerous areas of the brain, including the cerebral cortex and thalamus. With legislation introduced in 1992, more work is being done to further understand the implications of psilocybin use in a number of disease states. Certain mental health disease states and symptoms have been studied, including [...]

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Multiple receptors contribute to the behavioral effects of indoleamine hallucinogens, Adam L. Halberstadt & Mark A. Geyer, 2011

Multiple receptors contribute to the behavioral effects of indoleamine hallucinogens Adam L. Halberstadt & Mark A. Geyer Neuropharmacology, 2011, 61, (3), 364–381. doi:10.1016/j.neuropharm.2011.01.017.   Abstract Serotonergic hallucinogens produce profound changes in perception, mood, and cognition. These drugs include phenylalkylamines such as mescaline and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (DOM), and indoleamines such as (+)-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and psilocybin. Despite their differences in chemical structure, the two classes of hallucinogens produce remarkably similar subjective effects in humans, and induce cross-tolerance. The phenylalkylamine hallucinogens are selective 5-HT2 receptor agonists, whereas the indoleamines are relatively nonselective for serotonin (5-HT) receptors. There is extensive evidence, from both animal and human studies, that the [...]

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